New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act

Legalization of recreational marijuana has proven more difficult for the new administration than expected.  A proposed bill, Senate Bill 2703 – and its companion, Assembly Bill 4497 – which would legalize the possession and personal use of small amounts of marijuana for people at least 21 years old was enthusiastically supported by Governor Phil Murphy

On August 10, 2018, the District Court for the District of New Jersey granted an employer’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit for disability discrimination, finding that neither the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“NJLAD”) nor the New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act (“CUMMA”) require an employer to waive a drug test. By way of

On July 16, 2018, the New Jersey Department of Health’s Division of Medicinal Marijuana (the “DOH”) issued a Request for Applications (“RFA”) for up to six additional Alternative Treatment Centers (“ATCs”), commonly referred to as medical marijuana dispensaries.  The DOH will award two licenses in the northern region of the state, two in the central

The number of authorized medical marijuana users in New Jersey is growing.  According to a 2017 Marist Poll, the number of adult Americans using marijuana is 22%.  Thus, employers should not be sitting idle, waiting for the decriminalization of recreational marijuana in New Jersey before making decisions regarding marijuana in the workplace.  Marijuana is already

While the likely decriminalization of recreational marijuana is all the buzz in New Jersey, employers cannot forget that they need to be prepared now to address an employee who is a medical marijuana card holder under New Jersey’s Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act (CUMMA) to avoid inadvertent disability discrimination.

Under the Americans with Disabilities

With the legalization of medical marijuana through New Jersey’s Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act, and the decriminalization of recreational marijuana on the horizon, employers may want to revisit their drug screening policies and consider eliminating testing for marijuana for positions that are not safety-sensitive or subject to federal law mandating a drug-free workplace.

With

On June 18, 2018, the New Jersey Department of Health (the “DOH”) published for comment its proposed amendments to the administrative regulations to New Jersey’s Medical Marijuana Program (“MMP”).  These regulations establish the standards by which the DOH implements the Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act, codified at N.J.S.A. 24:6I-1 et. seq.

The proposed regulatory amendments

Senator Nicholas J. Scutari, D-Union, recently introduced a new bill that seeks to simultaneously legalize recreational marijuana for adults and provide broader patient access to medical marijuana under New Jersey’s Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act. This is the first bill to jointly address access to medical and recreational marijuana in New Jersey. Scutari’s comprehensive bill

I recently authored a guest column for NJ Cannabis Insider titled, “What’s next for medical marijuana in N.J.” The article outlines several compliance-related takeaways for the thousands of individuals and businesses eager to enter what is expected to become a multi-billion industry in New Jersey – medical (and, ultimately, recreational) marijuana.

There are three key

Amid the vibrant public discussion of the full legalization of marijuana in New Jersey, it’s important to note that significant changes are also coming to the way medical marijuana is distributed in the state. As previously documented in this blog, Governor Phil Murphy has already enacted important reforms expanding patient access to medical marijuana