While the likely decriminalization of recreational marijuana is all the buzz in New Jersey, employers cannot forget that they need to be prepared now to address an employee who is a medical marijuana card holder under New Jersey’s Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act (CUMMA) to avoid inadvertent disability discrimination.

Under the Americans with Disabilities

With the legalization of medical marijuana through New Jersey’s Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act, and the decriminalization of recreational marijuana on the horizon, employers may want to revisit their drug screening policies and consider eliminating testing for marijuana for positions that are not safety-sensitive or subject to federal law mandating a drug-free workplace.

With

I recently authored a guest column for NJ Cannabis Insider titled, “What’s next for medical marijuana in N.J.” The article outlines several compliance-related takeaways for the thousands of individuals and businesses eager to enter what is expected to become a multi-billion industry in New Jersey – medical (and, ultimately, recreational) marijuana.

There are three key

Governor Murphy’s administration is considering a phased-in tax rate for recreational marijuana following talks with Senator Nicholas Scutari, D-22nd District, according to state treasury spokesperson Jennifer Sciortino.

In his budget proposal address in March, the governor announced that the state stands to realize upwards of $80 million in annual revenues from taxing legal marijuana

With legalization of recreational cannabis on the horizon for New Jersey, several local governments have responded by preemptively passing ordinances banning or discouraging recreational marijuana sales or cultivation in their jurisdictions, while others have opened their doors. Because New Jersey is a home-rule state, municipalities are free to permit or prohibit the sale, cultivation and/or